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Wolf Creek Heritage Museum Photo Album
A Museum of History and Art in historic Lipscomb, Texas
Map 13310 Highway 305 · P.O. Box 5
Lipscomb, Texas 79056
806-852-2123
staff@wolfcreekheritagemuseum.org
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April 12, 2009

WOLF CREEK HERITAGE MUSEUM NOTES
by Virginia Scott

MUSEUM HAPPENINGS

Another week of weather that only Spring in the Panhandle can bring. It ended on a great note with wonderful rain. Easter morning was a true sight with a gentle rain or drizzle , a very welcome blessing to our dry land. The museum ladies were very productive this week. As promised the membership renewals were sent out in the mail. The 2008 updates for the Cemetery Book were also mailed. Lastly, we sent out invitations to our April 26th Tea Party . Posters are also circulating throughout the county. RSVPs will be appreciated so we have an idea of the number coming. It will be a great afternoon.

Ann Wright has returned from her winter retreat. On her first day back, She prepared an answer to a request from a fourth grader in Murchinson, TX . The student stated that their class was preparing a travel project called "Around the World :Texas Edition" She requested information concerning Lipscomb County. Ann prepared a great package with information on all our towns, their events, the pamphlets from the area, calendar of events, and some photographs of the county. It is these requests that make it fun.

OK , I need to correct my report on the museum's gift from Wendell Henton. Mr. Henton is from Booker and has graciously given the museum a kitchen range who originally belonged to the Walts Johns of Booker. The range has added a new "modern" look to the pioneer room. He also gave us a Go Devil which belonged to his parents George and Sophie Henton. Thanks Mr. Henton for remembering us and adding to the history of the county, sorry I got it wrong the first time.

HISTORICAL HAPPENINGS

I hope everyone enjoyed Easter Weekend. The rain was light enough so that the truly dedicated could have an easter egg hunt. The word "Easter" is named after Eastre, the Anglo-Saxon goddess of spring. A festival was held in her honor every year at the vernal equinox. The Easter Bunny is a rabbit-spirit. Long ago, he was called the "Easter Hare." Hares and rabbits have frequent multiple births so they became a symbol of fertility. The custom of an Easter egg hunt began because children believed that hares laid eggs in the grass. The Romans believed that "All life comes from an egg." Christians consider eggs to be " the seed of life", and so they are symbolic of the resurrection of Jesus Christ. Why we dye, or color, and decorate eggs is not certain. In ancient Egypt, Greece, Rome and Persia eggs were dyed for the spring festivals. In medieval Europe, beautifully decorated eggs were given as gifts. Dolly Madison, the wife of the fourth American President, organized an egg roll in Washington, D.C. She had been told that Egytian children used to roll eggs against the pyramids so she invited the children of Washington to roll hard-boiled eggs down the hilly lawn of the new Capitol building. In 1880, the First Lady invited children to the White House for the Egg Roll because officials had complained that they were ruining the Capitol lawn.

People celebrate the holiday according to their beliefs and their religious denominations. Christians commemorate Good Friday as the day that Jesus Christ died and Easter Sunday as the day that He was resurrected. Protestant settlers brought the custom of a sunrise service, a religious gathering at dawn, to the United States.

I am off to Austin. See you in a week.


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